Tag Archives: innovation

Denied Economies and Creative Performances by Kerry Thomas

May 29, 2014

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Kerry Thomas, 2012, Rumination, Chicago

Kerry Thomas, 2012, Rumination, Chicago

What has the economy got to do with creative performances and the making of artists and their artworks?

Over the last ten years I have been researching creative practice in university art school studios and senior school art classrooms. The focus has been on how students ‘invest’ in the creative life, oftentimes seeking to become creative artists, and working under pressure of high stakes assessments, to produce creative artefacts – paintings, drawings, installations, digital media works and so on. The related issue of what role, if any, do their teachers play in assisting them in the development of their creative performances and in what they make has also been investigated.

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Unlocking Creative Management – by Chris Bilton and Stephen Cummings

January 29, 2014

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commerce court, CIBC

photo credit: Paul Bica via Flickr cc

Creativity is not a tangible asset like mineral deposits that can be hoarded or fought over or even bought or sold. We must begin to think of creativity as a common good, like liberty or security. It is something essential that belongs to all of us, and that must always be fed, renewed and maintained—or else it will slip away” (Florida, 2002: xxvi).

Managers aspiring to maintain and renew this asset will find much food for thought in the recently published Handbook Of Management And Creativity, which draws on current research and case studies to consider creativity across four aspects of business: innovation, entrepreneurship, leadership and organisation.

In the following article, the editors Chris Bilton and Stephen Cummings explain the importance of adopting an integrated approach.

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Creating Competitiveness to spur Economic Performance: the Importance of Encouraging Entrepreneurship and Innovation – by David Audretsch

May 24, 2013

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Entrepreneurship and Innovation image

photo credit: MAZZALIARMADI.IT via Flickr cc

There is virtual unanimity that most of the developed world has been suffering from an economic slowdown in recent years. Much of the policy debate, along with focus of the media and public, has been at the macroeconomic level. The result has been a preoccupation with the size of the stimulus and the adequacy of the federal deficit, or alternatively tax cuts at the federal level in the United States, and the fate of the Euro in Europe. The implication for cities, regions and states aspiring to improve their economic performance is that it is largely not in their hands but rather at the level of macroeconomic and monetary policy makers.

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Cities Are Extraordinary – by Peter Taylor

January 23, 2013

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Photo: Mugley, Creative Commons 2.0

Photo: Mugley, Creative Commons 2.0

Peter Taylor is looking at world history from a fresh perspective: what happens if we put cities first? The results, as he explains in his new book Extraordinary Cities, are intriguing. Cities are revealed as being world-changing loci, with an innovative capacity that will be vital in producing a resilient global society necessary to carry us safely through the 21st century.

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Technological Innovation and Prize Incentives – by Luciano Kay

January 18, 2013

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Photo: Jeff Foust, Creative Commons 2.0

Photo: Jeff Foust, Creative Commons 2.0

Inducement prizes – the old trick of offering cash rewards to motivate the attainment of targets — have become very popular in the last decade. Advocates argue that prize sponsors can effectively attract people to compete and solve a wide range of today’s challenges by setting an appropriate set of rules and offering a sizable cash purse. Moreover, some scholarly works have analyzed the potential advantages that prizes may have over more traditional incentives to promote science and technological innovation. Government agencies, companies and other non-profit organizations, then, look with much interest at this phenomenon and seek to implement their own prize competitions.

But although these prizes have long been used and may have led to valuable discoveries and inventions, little empirical evidence has been around to fully understand how prizes work. My book “Technological Innovation and Prize Incentives” seeks to fill that knowledge gap and provides some answers to key questions such as the relative importance of the cash purse and other motivations to participate in prizes, the characteristics of research and development (R&D) activities induced by prizes, the characteristics of the technologies developed in prize competitions, and—more importantly—whether prizes spur innovation over and above what would have occurred anyway thanks to other traditional innovation incentives already in place.

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