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Women in Law. The Feminist Lawyer I Became

March 5, 2019

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Woman walking up Steps of US Supreme Court

“I realized that I could really make a (maybe small, but still) change”

Sara De Vido is assistant professor of international law at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, Italy, and affiliate to the Manchester International Law Centre, UK, where she co-founded the Women in International Law Network (WILNET). She wrote a book on the Istanbul Convention in 2016 (Donne, violenza e diritto internazionale), and several articles on the Convention and the impact of its ratification by the EU.

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Women in Law. Cricket Bats and Constitutions

March 5, 2019

3 Comments

determined face

“I have the honour of teaching the new generations of lawyers and I think they are extraordinary. Despite threats to global world order and general destabilisation, I am very hopeful for the future of women in international law”

Danielle Ireland Piper is Associate Professor of International and Comparative Constitutional Law at Bond University, Australia.

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Women in Law. Give Women an Opportunity and we can Effect Change

March 4, 2019

1 Comment

AI(Artificial Intelligence) concept.

“I believe we should not accept what the law is but strive to make it what it should be”

Felicity Gerry QC is International Queen’s Counsel at Crockett Chambers, Melbourne and Carmelite Chambers, London.

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Women in Law. Knowing When to Leap

March 4, 2019

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Women in the city

“knowing when to leap – life is precious, if things aren’t working say no to complacency and scare yourself with new opportunities”

Rosie Burbidge is a Partner at Gunnercooke LLP, London UK

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The Microsoft warrant case in the Supreme Court – be prepared for disappointments

January 4, 2018

2 Comments

Global Network (World map texture credits to NASA)

Dan J.B. Svantesson discusses The Microsoft Warrant case and the potential ramifications on data privacy.

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